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  • News

    • Sanctuary Guild Volunteers for September 2nd thru September 16th Barbara Niesczur, Andrea Powers & Toni Suchy
    • Sanctuary Guild Volunteers for August 20th thru September 1st Kathy Bondzio & Patty Kowalec
    • Miraculous things happen when you embrace Jesus Christ!
  • Sick & Hospitalized

    May the sick and their caregivers, receive comfort and strength through our prayers, remembering especially
    John Balciar, Mary Ann Betliskey,
    Millie Bloedorn, Bill Connors, Nancy Cox, Corrine Dawe, Jose Dybzinski, Kristin Hill, Frances Holecek, Cindi Magyar,
    Dorothy Mangan, Linda Rivera,
     Jeffrey Sottile Sr.,  Andrew Turowski and Virginia Turowski
     
                            For the safety of the Men and Women serving in the military, especially those from our parish and their families.
     

  • Stewardship of Treasure


    Thank you for your continued generosity and financial support.
    Sunday, August 24th 2432.00
    Praise the Roof 76.00
    Faith & Values 139.00
    Utilities 53.00
       
       
  • Notes from your Pastor

    August 24, 2014
     
                    Today’s Gospel presents us with Jesus and His Apostles travelling to an out of the way place to be asked a question and to discover an answer.  This passage has Jesus and His Apostles travelling to a particular location way north in Galilee called Ceasarea Philippi.
                    This city contained one of the most prominent landmarks in all of Israel.  It was built on a massive wall of rock over 100 feet high and 500 feet wide.  There, a marble temple had been erected to honor Caesar who considered himself to be a god.  Through the years, hundreds of people travelled to this spot to carve niches into the side of this enormous cliff, place statues of their pagan gods into them and then worship these pagan gods.
                    Jesus took His Apostles some 25 miles out of the way, all on foot!, for the sole purpose of asking them a single question.  He obviously wanted the backdrop of a massive rock, a marble temple and all the honors given to the emperors and their gods, when He asked a question that is possibly the most important in all of the Gospels….”Who do you say that I am?”
                    That same question, of course is not addressed only to His first followers thousands of years ago.  It echoes down through the centuries until it lands on each of our ears today…”Who do you say that I am?”
                    Possibly, like those first Apostles, you and I are called to travel to the “out of the way place” to be asked that question and to discover an answer.  Simon Peter answers the question, “You are the Christ, the Son of the Living God.”  Jesus compliments Simon.  The answer is a revelation from the Father.  Simon was given the name, Peter, which means rock.  Jesus proclaims the Church will be built on the rock of Simon Peter’s faith.
                    Like Simon Peter, we are called to be open to travel to a new place, to embrace a new direction, to receive new insights into that question.  Possibly, we take a trip somewhere, go to a new place, interact with a new person, take up a new project and in that framework we are open to receiving the question and discovering the answer.
                    At various times in our lives, this question will be asked of us.  I hope that we can answer the question in our present existential situation.  Who is Jesus for me?  Is He the Lord of my life?  If He is Lord of my life, is Christ ruling over all my decisions and actions?  Am I living the life, which He wants me to live?  Am I responding to the invitations that Christ gives me?
                    This passage involves the Church and our parish community is part of the Universal Church…How am I responding to the basic invitation to share my time, talent and treasure with our parish community?  I would like to again thank Kathy Bartoszek, our Parish Picnic Committee, all the volunteers and everyone who donated their time, talent and treasure to make our Parish Picnic a beautiful event.  The response of many people to this event was an inspiring example of answering the questions: Who is Jesus for me?  What is the Lord calling me to do?
                    Invitations to worship, fellowship, education and service oftentimes appear in our parish bulletin.  It is always good to pray over the invitations and ask the Lord if He is calling us to respond to a particular invitation.   Everyone is invited to come see a movie Friday night, August 29 th at 6:30 pm at the rectory.  “God is Not Dead” is a story of a first year college student who is challenged by his philosophy professor to present his reason for believing in God.
    Also, for those who are interested in receiving the sacraments of our Catholic Faith, we will also be having RCIA classes.  Please contact our pastoral minister, Karen Beargie should you wish to participate or if you have questions.  You may call her at 216-641-8444; ext. 13.
     
                    All of us are called to have a personal relationship with Christ and to have interpersonal relationships with one another.  The Church begins being built upon the rock of Peter’s faith.  The Church continues to be built upon the rocks of our faith as well.
    Let us continue to display openness to travel beyond our personal map of reality, beyond our personal comfort zones to be asked the question and to respond with an answer to the question “Who do you say that I am?”  The question is not posed only once but continues to be asked as we journey through life together.  Not only our words but more importantly our actions are an answer to these questions:
    • Who is Jesus for me?
    • What is Christ calling me to do to build our parish community?
     
    May our lives display a positive openness to these questions as we travel together with Jesus and His Apostles.
     
     
     
     

     
  • Karen's Korner

     Did you know that in 1996,
    Fr. Alejandro Pezet had just finished distributing Communion, when a woman came up to him and told him a host had been left on a candleholder in the back of the Church?  He was unable to consume the host because it had been defiled in some way, so he put it in a small container with water and left it in the tabernacle.  Eight days later, when Fr. Pezet went to get the Host, it had turned into a bloody substance.  He informed his bishop and the substance was photographed.  The photos showed that the host had grown much larger and had become a fragment of bloody flesh.  It was sent to New York where a time of forensic pathologists determined that the substance was real flesh and contained human DNA.  The analyzed substance was a fragment of the heart muscle found in the wall of the left ventricle close to the valves.  This muscle is responsible for the contraction of the heart.  It should be said that the left heart ventricle pumps blood to all parts of the body.  It was also said that the heart muscle is in an inflammatory condition and contained a large number of white blood cells.  This tells us that the heart was alive at the time the sample was taken since white blood cells die outside a living organism. 
              There is more to this article and I have posted it on St. John’s Facebook page.  How and why this host changed its character to become living human flesh and blood is a total mystery to science, one that just cannot be explained.  When I first read this, I thought WOW!  It is through such wondrous signs God calls souls to conversion. If Jesus causes the Host to become visible flesh and blood, a muscle that is responsible for the contraction of a human heart—a heart that suffers like that of someone who has been beaten severely about the chest, if He does such things, it is in order to arouse and quicken our faith in His real presence in the Eucharist. He thus enables us to see that Holy Mass is a making present of the entire drama of our salvation: Christ’s passion, death, and resurrection.  There is no need to actively seek out wondrous signs. But if Jesus chooses to give them to us, then it would be best for us to accept them with meekness and seek to understand what He desires to tell us by them. Thanks to these signs, many people have discovered faith in God.  Isn’t that what the Church teaches us?  That the Eucharist IS the body of blood of Jesus, but it stays in a form that we are able to consume to become one with Christ through our eating of His flesh and drinking of His blood.   The Eucharist is the most important part of my faith, and I hope yours too. 
     
    See you soon!    
    Karen